1985 Topps

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Trade with Crinkly Wrappers

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

I just entered 96 cards that I needed to build my sets into my card database.  The cards came courtesy of Crinkly Wrappers.  Since they were all base cards, I won’t bore you with the details, but here’s the breakdown of the new cards in my collection:

7 of 1985 Topps

22 of 2008 Topps

1 of 2008 Topps Update

1 of 2009 Topps

3 of 2009 Topps Update

62 of 2010 Topps

That means I only need 24 more cards to complete my 2010 Topps Series 1 set.  For the record, I’ve never completed a set before, but with the new cards and the 2010 Topps Series 2 jumbo box I bought, 2010 Topps might be my first.  Thanks Crinkly Wrappers for helping me out!

In return, I sent him all 8 of my 2010 Topps Gold cards, a 1987 Topps card he needed to complete a set, and as many Blue Jays as I could muster.

25 Years Later… Mike Dunne

Thursday, December 31st, 2009

Today is the last day of 2009.  This is my last unopened pack of 1985 Topps:

  1. #748 Lee Mazzilli
  2. #221 Ron Reed
  3. #166 Keith Atherton
  4. #640 Steve Henderson
  5. #348 Bob Boone
  6. #563 Dick Ruthven
  7. #216 Jerry Don Gleaton
  8. #716 Dale Murphy (All-Star)
  9. #395 Mike Dunne (USA) (Rookie)
  10. #76 Alan Bannister
  11. #140 Roy Smalley/Roy Smalley (Father-Son)
  12. #463 Dave Collins
  13. #196 Pete O’Brien
  14. #728 Bob Bailor
  15. #381 Roy Smith (Rookie)

Mike Dunne was a member of the talented 1984 Team USA Olympic baseball team and was later drafted in the 1st round by the St. Louis Cardinals.  His 13-6 record and 3.03 ERA on his rookie season put him at second place in Rookie of the Year voting in 1987.  Despite his promising start, injuries hampered him for the rest of his career, and he retired from professional baseball in 1994, when he went 2-2 with a 5.22 ERA for the AAA Scranton-Wilkes Barre Red Barons.

In 2000, Mike Dunne became the pitching coach for the Bradley Braves.  Dunne coached at Bradley University for 8 years before leaving in 2008.

25 Years Later… Dwight Gooden

Monday, December 14th, 2009

1985 Topps:

  1. #728 Bob Bailor
  2. #196 Pete O’Brien
  3. #463 Dave Collins
  4. #140 Roy Smalley/Roy Smalley
  5. #739 Ernie Camacho
  6. #240 Dave Stieb
  7. #451 Bruce Hurst
  8. #779 Nick Esasky
  9. #218 Doyle Alexander
  10. #620 Dwight Gooden (Rookie)
  11. #664 Steve Farr (Rookie)
  12. #718 Jeff Leonard (All-Star)
  13. #603 Rick Manning
  14. #543 Johnny Grubb
  15. #778 Mike Davis

Dwight Gooden was one of the most dominant pitchers of the 80′s.  However, drug and alcohol abuse destroyed what would have been a Hall of Fame-worthy career.

Gooden’s problems with cocaine and alcohol abuse continued even after his retirement from professional baseball in 2000.  Most recently, he spent much of 2006 in prison for his cocaine habit.  In an interview from prison on May 31, 2006, Gooden said, “I can’t come back here. [...] I’d rather get shot than come back here. [...] If I don’t get the message this time, I never will.”

So far, it looks like Doc has been clean since he was released from incarceration.  In 2008, he appeared at the final celebration at Shea Stadium, and in 2009 he made an appearance at the new Citi Field.

25 Years Later… Pat Pacillo

Monday, December 7th, 2009

1985 Topps:

  1. #702 Damaso Garcia (All-Star)
  2. #402 Pat Pacillo (USA) (Rookie)
  3. #462 Gary Lavelle
  4. #222 Hubie Brooks
  5. #607 Bill Almon
  6. #751 Kelvin Chapman
  7. #683 Whitey Herzog (Manager)
  8. #307 Sparky Anderson (Manager)
  9. #182 Tim Flannery
  10. #415 Ron Darling
  11. #19 George Frazier
  12. #438 Joe Torre (Manager)
  13. #253 Sid Bream
  14. #352 Joe Morgan
  15. #15 Jerry Koosman

Pat Pacillo was a talented pitcher/outfielder in high school.  He played on the 1984 USA Olympic Team alongside Mark McGwire, Barry Larkin, and Will Clark.  He was drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the 1st round, 5th pick overall.  After two unsuccessful Major League seasons and several minor league seasons, Pat retired from professional baseball in 1990 at the age of 26.

After his retirement in 1990, Pat has faded from the public view.

25 Years Later… Bob James

Monday, November 30th, 2009

1985 Topps:

  1. #728 Bob Bailor
  2. #196 Pete O’Brien
  3. #463 Dave Collins
  4. #140 Roy Smalley/Roy Smalley (Father-Son)
  5. #684 Bill Doran
  6. #774 Dennis Lamp
  7. #596 Jerry Hairston
  8. #441 Duane Walker
  9. #661 Steve Crawford
  10. #586 Bill Scherrer
  11. #674 Atlee Hammaker
  12. #647 Rafael Ramirez
  13. #123 Dave Smith
  14. #114 Bob James
  15. #270 Dan Quisenberry

Bob James was drafted by the Montreal Expos in the first round in 1976.  In 1978, he made his major league debut at the age of 20.  He pitched 8 seasons as a relief pitcher for the Montreal Expos, Detroit Tigers, and Chicago White Sox 1978-1979, and 1982-1987.

I can find no information about Bob James after he was released by the Chicago White Sox in 1987.  He is 51 years old now and might still be living in his hometown just outside of Los Angeles, California.

25 Years Later… Howard Johnson

Monday, November 23rd, 2009

1985 Topps:

  1. #281 Tim Belcher (#1 Draft Pick)
  2. #397 John Hoover (Team USA) (Rookie)
  3. #192 Howard Johnson
  4. #754 Larry Milbourne
  5. #357 Rich Bordi
  6. #387 Buddy Biancalana
  7. #39 Johnny Wockenfuss
  8. #730 Dave Kingman
  9. #708 Lance Parrish (All-Star)
  10. #242 Greg Harris
  11. #210 Gary Matthews
  12. #113 Tom Herr
  13. #62 Mike Ramsey
  14. #298 Marty Barrett
  15. #633 Glenn Hoffman

Howard Johnson established himself in the late 80′s as one of the greatest New York Mets players.  He set several league and team switch-hitting records while with the Mets.

Today, HoJo is the hitting coach for the New York Mets.  His son, Glen Johnson, is a switch-hitting shortstop for the Jacksonville University baseball team.

25 Years Later… Nick Esasky

Monday, November 16th, 2009

1985 Topps:

  1. #45 Greg Minton
  2. #51 Bob Watson
  3. #20 Chet Lemon
  4. #529 Rich Gedman
  5. #782 Tom Niedenfuer
  6. #659 Checklist 529-660 (Checklist)
  7. #380 Ken Griffey
  8. #146 Gary Redus
  9. #669 Lee Lacy
  10. #261 Checklist 133-264 (Checklist)
  11. #779 Nick Esasky
  12. #451 Bruce Hurst
  13. #240 Dave Stieb
  14. #739 Ernie Camacho
  15. #715 Ozzie Smith (All-Star)

Nick Esasky had a promising Major League career in the works after his 1989 season in which he hit .277 with 30 home runs.  However, vertigo caused by an ear infection forced him to retire early from baseball in 1992.

Recently, Nick has been fighting a battle to save his daughter from meth addiction.  He also still suffers from the vertigo that cut short his baseball career.

25 Years Later… Doug Sisk

Monday, November 9th, 2009

1985 Topps:

  1. #465 Bob Grich
  2. #343 Bill Russell
  3. #169 Dan Spillner
  4. #426 Vern Ruhle
  5. #789 Luis Salazar
  6. #645 Damaso Garcia
  7. #99 Milt Wilcox
  8. #422 Carney Lansford
  9. #745 Buddy Bell
  10. #315 Doug Sisk
  11. #27 Bruce Berenyi
  12. #678 Joey McLaughlin
  13. #3 Dwight Gooden (Record Breaker)
  14. #279 Mike Moore (#1 Draft Pick)
  15. #753 Greg Brock

Interestingly, Damaso Garcia and Carney Lansford were both in this pack and were born on the same day, February 7, 1957.

Doug Sisk was a member of the notorious Mets “Scum Bunch”.  He is known for having a sinker that was very difficult to hit into the air, resulting in him giving up only 15 home runs over his major league career of over 500 innings pitched.

You can find a recent audio interview with Doug Sisk here.  Doug’s Wikipedia article states that he became the Athletic Director of the Lakewood, WA Boys & Girls Club in 2003, but I haven’t been able to verify this.